Jennifer Kibble is The Phoenix Element!

Jen


BIO:

Phoenix Element came across in an interesting way. Jennifer would have
the same type of dreams and characters since she was a young girl. One
day she decided to use those characters in a story. Of course with
most characters, they take over the story and lead the writer instead
of the writer telling the characters what to do.

Parts of Phoenix Element started out as a series of short stories
known as The Eternal Nine Key Barriers (E9KB) back in middle school.
This branched off as a role playing story on a message board. Later
on, Phoenix Element started to grow into its own and became what it is
today.

Jennifer is a geek at heart, who enjoys video games, reading, and
Dungeons and Dragons. She works as a cook at a high end casino while
trying to get her writing career off the ground. Jennifer has been
writing off and on since the 5th grade.


AUTHOR Q&A:

  1.  When did you first realize you wanted to be a writer?

That happened while I was in the fifth grade at Davie Elementary. My teacher told us to write a story (I think it was each week) in our composition books. Once I started to write, I was hooked. I knew it was something that I wanted to do. But back in the early 90’s, I had no idea to get a writing career started, so I kept writing for me throughout middle school. My eighth grade teacher allowed me to write a book series (with a new story each week) for a grade.

I was writing less when I got to high school. I was busy with drama, swim team, a part time job at Burger King, and then the usual high school stuff, I had zero time to write. I didn’t pick up writing again until I was in my early-to-mid-twenties. I was roleplaying on a message board and that kick started the writing juices.

Fast forward to 2010/2011, where I was picked (among others) to watch the final launch of the space shuttle Discovery (STS-133). I was moved by what I experienced there, that it inspired me to pursue publishing my books.

  1.  How long does it take to write your book(s)?

Anywhere from a year to three years. It all depends on how busy I am, and if the characters want to cooperate while I’m writing.

  1.  What is your work schedule like when writing a book?

I try to write when I can but not to force it. I don’t want to make writing a book, seem like work. When that happens, the words flow less and I start to get writer’s block. Normally, I try to write on my days off from my “day job”. That way I won’t feel rush to finish a chapter before leaving for work.

  1. Where do you get your ideas or information for your book?

Video games, fantasy books, fantasy/sci-fi TV shows and movies, comic books (I read a lot of comics when I was a teenager). And the kicker, from my dreams. A lot of the characters and places that I write about, came from my dreams when I was younger. Nowadays, if I have a problem writing a scene, I try to think about that scene before going to sleep, in hopes that it plays out in my dreams, and fingers crossed, I remember it the next day.

  1. When did you write your first book?

Officially, I started in 2010. It has been eight years since I started to take my writing seriously.

  1. What do you do when you’re not writing?

Working, that takes up the main chunk of it. But for fun, I enjoy playing video games, Dungeons & Dragons, and painting.

  1. What was the most surprising thing you learned in creating your books?

I learned that the characters are the ones in control. While writing, especially while writing Mages of Vane, it felt like I was being pulled along during the story instead of the other way around.

  1. How many books have you written? Which is your favorite?

Since I used to write a lot of short stories when I was younger, it is hard to say. But officially, three published books in the Phoenix Element series, and one book of poems that I had written as a teenager.

My favorite used to be Mages of Vane, but now I am leaning more towards Reality Break. The characters really come together in that. However I do love the magical fight scenes from Mages of Vane.

  1. Any tips/suggestions on getting started?

Write for yourself and make sure to have fun with it. Don’t make writing a chore, but a hobby. A familiar place that you can always go back to.

  1. As a child, what did you want to do when you grew up?

Of course I wanted to be a writer, and that started when I was in the fifth grade. But that wasn’t all. I had a pen pal from Australia, who wanted to be a marine biologist, which meant I wanted to be one as well. Then there was Nancy Drew, Darkwing Duck, and Sherlock Holmes, which wanted me to be a detective when I got older. Never did I image that I would be a cook. I didn’t like to cook when I was a kid. I was a fast food child. Growing up poor, eating fast food was the cheapest way to go. My first job was working at Burger King. Now I’m a cook at a casino (ten years at this location), where most recently, I make sushi.


LINKS:

Phoenix Element Collection on Amazon:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1794317406
Author Bio on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Jennifer-Kibble/e/B00BG2PAQU
Twitter: @Next_Jen https://twitter.com/Next_Jen
Facebook Author Page: https://www.facebook.com/AuthorJenniferKibble/
Facebook Group Page: https://www.facebook.com/groups/198951910873769/

PUBLISHED WORKS:

Pheonix Collection Book 1-3 Cover

Romance is in the air with Virginia Martin

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BIO:

Virginia Martin has been passionate about writing since the age of 11 and loves to express herself through the written word. She holds a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration and is currently seeking her Master’s in Business with a concentration in Human Resources.  A Human Resources professional for the past 20 years, she loves helping people in any way she can.  She is a member of the Romance Writers of America and Florida Romance Writers and is an avid reader of romance novels. Apart from reading, writing, and basking in the South Florida sun, Virginia enjoys photography, listening to Christian music and playing Scrabble.

To contact Virginia Martin, or to be placed on a mailing list to receive updates about new releases, click the “Contact Me” page on her author blog: www.virginiamartinauthor.net or send her an email at virginiamartinauthor@gmail.com.


AUTHOR Q&A:

1. When did you first realize you wanted to be a writer? VM: I have been writing since the age of 10, and I don’t even think I realized I was a writer at that time. My first type of writing was lyrics to made up songs. The first song I wrote was titled: Roses For My Love. I remember just a few words from it: “Roses for my love, without you I don’t know who I am”. Then I started writing poetry, I liked rhyming words. Writing became an emotional outlet in times of loneliness, sadness, love, happy moments, and loss.
2. How long does it take to write your book(s)? VM: The length of time it takes to write a book, depends on the type of book it is. My debut book, Faith Without Borders Devotional (the first book in the Without Borders Inspirational Series) took me a year to write. I wrote things throughout the year and then put it together for the book. This book is very personal to me because it is my personal testimony in receiving God’s grace during some very dark times in my life.  On the other hand, the journals in my Journals To Remember Series took one to two months to write, the same for my inspirational quotes book, In My Thoughts.
3. What is your work schedule like when writing a book? VM: My work schedule when writing a book is a bit sporadic. I start writing non-stop, then I take a break, sometimes a week or two, then I pick up writing again. I put everything on paper first, then type it. I do most of my typing in the morning to early afternoon. I am not much use after 4 pm. Since I work, I do most of the writing on the weekend.
4. Where do you get your ideas or information for your book? VM: I am a Christian author, so most of my books are faith based, and I feel they are inspired by God. I read a lot of devotional type books and have read the Bible three times. I also draw from my own experience and reading romance books. I love journal writing, so I decided to start the Journals To Remember Series based on that. Most of my poems are faith, life and love related.
5. When did you write your first book? VM: The first book I wrote, and which I am very proud of, is the Faith Without Borders Devotional. I self-published it in November 2015. It has personal accounts of my spiritual journey, with points for reflection and biblical references. For someone starting on their walk of faith, this book is a good place to start.
6. What do you do when you’re not writing? VM: When I am not writing I am reading, teaching myself the keyboard, and learning how to do hand lettering. I also enjoy listening to Christian music and playing Scrabble.
7. What does your family think of your writing? VM: My family, which are my two daughters, are very proud of my writing. I give them a copy of each book I write. I encourage them to write as well.  One of them, my favorite author, Cristina Isabel, is a writer in her own right.
8. What was the most surprising thing you learned in creating your books? VM: The most surprising thing I learned in creating my books is how much fun it can be to them, from start to finish. It is a lot of work, of course, but you are a part of the whole process, and it feels good to see the finished product. I enjoy doing the book cover first, I am a visual person, and to me, having the book cover first, makes the book come alive.
9. How many books have you written? Which is your favorite? VM: I have written six books so far: 1 devotional, 1 poetry book, 1 quotes book, and three journals. My favorite is the poetry book because I love writing poems. They express a lot of what is in my thoughts, and the way I feel about things.
10. Any tips/suggestions on getting started? VM: My tip on getting started is to just write. I believe anyone can write, it is just putting the time and effort to do so. We all have a story to tell, so I encourage everyone to write theirs and share it with the world.
11. What do you think makes a good story? VM: A good story must be genuine, heart-felt, and relatable, in order to connect with the reader. I believe writing stories with a theme, interesting characters, and plot is the best way to engage the reader and keep them coming back for more.
12. As a child, What did you want to do when you grew up? VM: As a child, I wanted to be a ballet dancer and a singer. Perhaps in another life I can still do it. For now, my calling is in writing to touch hearts.


LINKS:

author blog: www.virginiamartinauthor.net

Amazon author page: amazon.com/author/virginiamartin

facebook page: www.facebook.com/mywritingself

twitter: @mywritingself

instagram: www.instragram.com/mywritingself

pinterest: www.pinterest.com/virginiamartinauthor

goodreads: www.goodreads.com/mywritingself

 

PUBLISHED WORKS:

picsallbooksvirginiamartinauthor

Science Fiction + Thriller + Urban Fantasy + Contemporary Romance = Jade Kerrion

KerrionJade


BIO:

At 4 a.m., when her husband and three sons are asleep, USA Today best-selling author JADE KERRION weaves unforgettable characters into unexpected stories.

Her debut science fiction novel, PERFECTION UNLEASHED, won six literary awards and launched the DOUBLE HELIX series which blends cutting-edge genetic engineering and high-octane action with an unforgettable romance between an alpha empath and an assassin.

Readers continue their adventures in this dystopian Earth with the spin-off futuristic thriller series DOUBLE HELIX CASE FILES, starting with MIRIYA.

The DAUGHTER OF AIR and LORD OF THE OCEAN series, beginning with CURSED TIDES, blends fairy tales and mythology into urban fantasy. It’s the story you always wanted to read: The Little Mermaid finally kicks ass!

Jade’s award-winning fantasy novel, ETERNAL NIGHT, draws you in the post-apocalyptic world of AETERNAE NOCTIS where humans—victims of a war between immortals—are about to tip the balance.

LIFE SHOCKS ROMANCES, starting with AROUSED, features Jade’s sweet and sexy contemporary romance series, which proves that, at the very least, she knows how to alphabetize books.

Jade’s devious plan for world domination begins with making all her readers as sleep-deprived as she is.


AUTHOR Q&A:

  1. When did you first realize you wanted to be a writer?

JK: I’ve always enjoyed writing, but I think I first realized it when I wrote Guild Wars Fan Fiction, featuring my characters and my friends’ characters. I’d show up in the game, announce that I’d posted a new episode, and all my guild members would just vanish because they wanted to read the latest installment immediately. I realized then that my superpower was writing stories!

  1. How long does it take to write your book(s)?

JK: I average about a thousand words a day, so I can usually complete a first draft of 60K words within two months. If I’m up against a deadline, I aim for two thousand words a day—a novel a month!

  1. What is your work schedule like when writing a book?

JK: I’m up at 3:30 am, and writing by 4 am. I usually spend 2 hours writing, and if I’m really focused, can write up to 2,000 words in 2 hours. Normally, though, I shoot for about 1,000 words. 2,000 can be exhausting; the frantic pace can really wear you down after a while.

  1. Where do you get your ideas or information for your book?

JK: They come from everywhere. Sometimes, they’re inspired by a picture. Often, they’re a blend of ideas that have been sitting and simmering for a while, based on something I’d read.

  1. When did you write your first book?

JK: I wrote my first book during the 2010 Nanowrimo, but ripped out the last third of the book, and rewrote it. It was published in June 2012.

  1. What do you do when you’re not writing?

JK: Well, I work full time in an amazing tech company that’s pushing the frontiers of mixed reality. It takes up most of my days. Writing is my side job, really.

  1. What does your family think of your writing?

JK: My son says I’m his favorite writer (even though he’s never read anything I’ve written) so I think he’s proud of me in a rather generalized sort of way. My husband tells people I’m a writer (even though that’s just my second job.)

  1. What was the most surprising thing you learned in creating your books?

JK: Trust yourself. You don’t need to plot everything in advance. You don’t have to make all the threads neatly tie together before you start writing. Some of my best twists have come while I was writing, because the concepts have had time to percolate and gel together.

  1. How many books have you written? Which is your favorite?

JK: I stopped counting at about 20. Also, the count gets skewed if you add in novellas and short stories. Do they count too? These days, I say 25+ and leave it at that. My favorite…is my current series that tells the story of the Little Mermaid you always wanted to read. She finally kicks ass!

  1. Any tips/suggestions on getting started?

JK: Sit your butt down in the chair and start writing or typing. Do you think you can fill a single page in Microsoft Word a day? Of course. It’s just one page. It’s easy. Well, that’s 500 words. Do that every day for 4 months, and you’ll have a novel. It’s not difficult. It just takes discipline, just like anything else.

  1. What do you think makes a good story?

JK: Unforgettable characters. In the end, if you can’t put a book down, it’s because you’ve fallen in love with the characters, and you don’t want the story to end. Twists are awesome, so are cliffhangers. They keep you turning pages, but in the end, what makes a story unforgettable, is the characters.

  1. As a child, what did you want to do when you grew up?

JK: I wanted to be a firefighter. Considering how generally unathletic I am, it’s probably good for the world I decided not to run into a burning house to save lives…


LINKS:

Website: http://www.jadekerrion.com

Free book with subscription: http://www.jadekerrion.com/mailinglist

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/jadekerrion

SOME PUBLISHED WORKS:Social Media - DoA (1)

Author with a Conscience – Ed Duncan

EDDUNCANPROFILE


BIO:

Ed Duncan is a graduate of Oberlin College and Northwestern University Law School. He was a partner at a national law firm in Cleveland, Ohio for many years. He currently lives outside of Cleveland, OH and has just completed “The Last Straw,” the second installment in the Pigeon-Blood Red trilogy. He is currently at work on the third installment of the trilogy. To learn more, go to http://eduncan.net/.


AUTHOR Q&A:

1. When did you first realize that you wanted to be a writer?
   ED: I have enjoyed writing since English composition days in high school.  My teachers regularly complimented me on my writing, but my eleventh grade English teacher gave me the ultimate compliment when she wrote on a term paper that my writing was seldom if ever equaled among the students at my school.  That was really the spark that lit my writer’s flame, although it remained barely an ember for quite some time.  Over the years I kept my teacher’s compliment tucked away in the back of my mind, but it was only after a career practicing law that I found the time and inspiration to act on it.
2.  How long does it take to write your books?
    ED: Since I’m retired, I only write when “the muse” arrives.  That is probably a bad idea for most writers, but for me it generally works just fine.  It means, however, that the amount of time it takes me to write a novel can vary substantially from book to book.  I started the first one, Pigeon-Blood Red, the first in a trilogy, while I was still practicing law, which meant I had to work on it part-time.  Also, I stopped and started quite a bit and I put it aside for long periods of time, all of which is to say that the finished product took years!  Once I retired, however, I wrote The Last Straw, the second novel in the trilogy, in a little less than a year.  I’m just getting started on the final novel in the trilogy, which will be called Rico Stays.  I’m already running into a number of distractions, so I can’t predict when I’ll finish this one.
3.  What is your schedule like when writing a book?
    ED: Since I only write when the mood strikes me, I don’t have any schedule at all.  I don’t have a publishing contract that requires me to produce a certain number of books over a given period, so my pace is entirely my own. I worked under enough deadlines when I was practicing law, and I’m happy not to have any deadlines in retirement.  I will say, though, that the muse generally arrives late at night, which means I’m more productive at that time.  The only rule I observe is that after I’ve written the first draft of something, no matter how long or short, I always review and rewrite that draft before writing something new.
4.  Where do you get your ideas or information for your book?
    ED: I was attending a legal seminar in Honolulu sometime in the mid-90’s when one evening a germ of an idea came to me.  I saw a beautiful woman traveling in Hawaii and carrying something valuable that bad people — dangerous people — wanted to get their hands on, and I saw a lawyer (like me!) coming to her rescue.  My imagination took over from there.  I determined that the valuable thing would be a piece of jewelry, a necklace.  I started researching various gems and came across one with an exotic description: a pigeon-blood red ruby, so named because its color resembles that of the first few drops of blood that trickle from the nostrils of a freshly killed pigeon.  I then determined that the person pursuing the woman would be more of an anti-hero than a villain and that he would be a “killer with a conscience.”  Once I imagined these basic ingredients, I added other details over the following weeks and months as ideas came to me.  This became Pigeon-Blood Red.  The main characters were the killer, the woman he was pursuing, the lawyer, and the killer’s girlfriend.  After I decided on a trilogy, I simply had to dream up two other dramatic plot lines that would bring these characters together.  Each of those plot lines would be the basis of another novel. 
5.  When did you write your first book?
    ED: Pigeon-Blood Red was first published in 2015.  However, my publisher went out of business, and the novel was republished by by current publisher in 2017.
6.  What do you do when you’re not writing?
    ED: I love to travel and have been fortunate enough to travel all over the world.  I’ve been to Mexico, Canada, Costa Rica, Panama, Aruba, Spain, France, Morocco, Argentina, Brazil, China, Hong Kong, Japan, and South Africa.  Of course, I read crime novels, literary fiction, nonfiction, and various newspapers and magazines.  I also watch a lot of movies.  And I spend too much time following politics.
7.  What does your family think of your writing?
    ED: I have three adult children and two young granddaughters.  My children are very excited about my novels, and my son may follow in my footsteps, hopefully before he retires.
8.  What was the most surprising thing you learned in creating your books?
    ED: I had always heard writers say that at a certain point characters take over and, in essence, write their own dialogue or do things you hadn’t planned for them to do.  I learned that that phenomenon is actually true.  For instance, the lawyer in my novels was always meant to be the main character.  However, the killer “fought me” at every turn, despite my best efforts, and wrested that position away from the lawyer. 
9.  How many books have you written?  Which is your favorite?
   ED:  I’ve only written two although I know what is going to happen in the third.  It is a cliche to say that writers view their novels as their children and that a writer can no more select his favorite novel than he can choose his favorite child.  I can say, however, that while Pigeon-Blood Red will always occupy a special place in my heart because it was my first, the story line of The Last Straw is probably more exciting.  As might be expected, the latter novel is probably a tad better written as well. 
10.  Any tips/suggestions on getting started?
    ED: Read widely, not just in your chosen genre and not just fiction.  I think all good writing helps writers become better at their craft, if only by osmosis.  Do multiple drafts and don’t be discouraged by the quality of your first draft.  Most writers I’ve heard express an opinion on the subject say that their first drafts are almost uniformly terrible.  I know mine certainly are.  So revise as much as is necessary to come up with something worthy of your talent.
11.  What do you think makes a good story?
    ED: This may sound like a cop out but I think anything a writer finds interesting can be turned into a good story if it it well written.  Often very little happens in literary fiction, but if the author has a sufficient command of the English language, such writing can be as compelling as that of any genre.  In my genre, crime fiction, I like well rounded characters who are confronted by circumstances and events that keep me on the edge of my seat and make me want to keep turning the page.  Even so, a good crime novel can be ruined by poor writing.
12.  As a child, what did you want to do when you grew up?
    ED: As a very young child I wanted to be a cowboy and a little later I wanted to be a spy!  Enough said!

LINKS:

PUBLISHED WORKS:

Alexander Zelenyj is Blacker Against the Deep Dark

Alexander Zelenyj - Author Photo from BATDD


BIO:

Alexander Zelenyj is the author of the books Blacker Against the Deep Dark, Songs for the Lost, Experiments At 3 Billion A.M., Black Sunshine, and Ballads to the Burning Twins: The Complete Song Lyrics of the Deathray Bradburys.  He lives in Windsor, Ontario, Canada, with his wife Elizabeth, and their menagerie of furry beasts.  Visit him online at alexanderzelenyj.com.


AUTHOR Q&A:

  1. When did you first realize you wanted to be a writer?

AZ: Some of my earliest memories relate to books, being fascinated by them as a child, drawing and making picture books. I was still a little boy when I discovered comic books and pulp fiction, and became obsessed with all things Robert E. Howard, which was a life-changing discovery for me. So I guess I always wanted to be a writer.

  1. How long does it take to write your book(s)?

AZ: It’s difficult to say with any degree of certainty, because I’m always working on multiple projects at once. Sometimes I’ll take an extended break from a particular manuscript to focus on another, and then I’ll go back to it later. And of course some books are more difficult to write, for any number of reasons, so those difficulties are reflected in the overall time it takes to finish that project. Other manuscripts almost seem to write themselves.

  1. What is your work schedule like when writing a book?

AZ: It varies a lot. Like I said, I work on multiple manuscripts at the same time, and pick away at whichever one I feel inspired to work on at any given time, or whichever one might have a pressing deadline. But I write every day, so something is always moving forward. I used to write exclusively very late at night and into the early morning but for the past few years I’ve changed gears and write much more in the morning and afternoon.

  1. Where do you get your ideas or information for your book?

AZ: I have no idea where the ideas come from. I suppose that the source for some ideas comes from things I see around me in the world on a daily basis. In terms of more general inspiration, that comes from a lot of different sources: the authors I love, films and music. But more often than not ideas will just be there when I sit down to write, and I get them down and move on to the next project, though where they come from I don’t exactly know.

  1. When did you write your first book?

AZ: My first published stand-alone book was a short novel, Black Sunshine, which was released by Fourth Horseman Press in 2005, though before that book I’d written several full-length manuscripts that I never did anything with. Which was probably wise, since they were probably not very good. I keep meaning to go back and read them again.

  1. What do you do when you’re not writing?

AZ: As you can guess, I’m a huge reader, so I’ve always got one or more books on the go at any given time. I love music and movies so I’m always obsessing over something in those mediums, too. My wife and I spend a lot of time doting on our pets as well.

  1. What does your family think of your writing?

AZ: They seem to enjoy it, even if their literary interests sometimes lie in different areas. Generally speaking, they’re really supportive. My mom was always encouraging when I was growing up. My oldest brother, Dan, has always been particularly supportive and encouraging. He’s a voracious reader and has been his whole life, so growing up and having him as a role model was a great thing for me. Some of my earliest memories involve books – my brother reading them, me emulating him and pretending to read them before I could actually read, and it went from there. And my wife, who is also an author, obviously understands the process, and is really supportive.

  1. What was the most surprising thing you learned in creating your books?

AZ: A couple of books ago, when I was finishing up Songs for the Lost, and especially while working on my newest collection, Blacker Against the Deep Dark, I came to realize how angry I was and am about a lot of things I see in the world every day. And that’s very obviously reflected in those stories, that anger at the negative things I see in the news all the time, locally and elsewhere. And from that what became clear to me is that a lot of the stories could be roughly divided into those that are very pessimistic and disheartening when looking at people and the terrible things we’re capable of doing to each other, and those stories that show the good we’re capable of. That dichotomy became more and more clear over the past couple of my books, and more and more important to the structure and integrity of those books.

  1. How many books have you written? Which is your favorite?

AZ: I’m the author of three collections of short fiction, several chapbooks, a short novel, and a collection of essays and poems. I have two new books forthcoming later this year: the first is a chapbook entitled Animals of the Exodus, to be published by Eibonvale Press and due this summer. The second, forthcoming from Fourth Horseman Press, is a full-length anthology comprised of the best stories taken from each of my three full-length collections, three chapbooks, and assorted fiction that has only ever been published in magazines and anthologies, plus some never-before-published material. The book is a celebratory volume commemorating the 10-year anniversary of my first published collection, and the 20-year anniversary of my first published story. This, and the fact that it’s being released by Fourth Horseman Press, who has published so much of my fiction over the years, makes this a very special and meaningful book to me personally.

As for which of my books is my personal favourite, that’s a tough question because I inevitably feel emotionally attached to every one of them, though I suppose I’m always the most excited about the newest book just because it’s so fresh. And I think each book an author writes should be stronger than the last, because an author should be growing with each successive release. So by that line of thought I’d say my favourite book of mine is my newest book, my short story collection, Blacker Against the Deep Dark (Eibonvale Press, 2018). But that will likely change by the time my next book is out in the world.

  1. Any tips/suggestions on getting started?

AZ: Read and write what you love and care about, and read and write every day. Everything else will fall into place.

  1. What do you think makes a good story?

AZ: There are a lot of different things: interesting characters, unique ideas, engrossing plots, themes that resonate in some way. That said, some stories have an indefinable quality that sets them apart from other stories; they fill a void that, had they not been written, it seems would represent some kind of glaring absence in the world. So while all those previously mentioned qualities might together make a good story, it’s this indefinable quality that makes a story something more than this, something truly special and great that goes far beyond the mechanics of things.

  1. As a child, What did you want to do when you grew up?

AZ: From as far back as I can remember I always wanted to be a writer. It’s been the one constant all along, no matter what else I had going on in my life.


LINKS:

Blacker Against the Deep Dark book page

Blacker Against the Deep Dark book trailer

www.alexanderzelenyj.com

Published Works:

jack6.000x9.000.inddSongs For The Lost Eibonvale Press CoverSongs For The Lost - Alexander Zelenyj - Independent Legions Publishing eBook cover artExperiments At 3 Billion A.M. - Alexander Zelenyj - 2nd Edition Cover